Series 3 FW v6.0 and newer: IPv6

Products Supported: AER31x0, AER2100, AER16x0, CBA850, MBR1400v2, CBA750B, IBR11x0, IBR6x0, IBR350 and MBR1200B. Click here to identify your router.

Firmware Version: 6.0.1 and newer – for information on upgrading firmware, click here.

Summary

This article provides the steps necessary to configure a Cradlepoint Router to use IPv6.

By default all current production models of Cradlepoint routers have IPv6 on the WAN disabled, however, IPV6 is enabled on the LANs. This article is intended to provide assistance with enabling IPV6 on the WAN and modifying the default settings for custom use. These settings should be configured in combination with the IPv6 LAN settings (go to Network → Local Networks → Local IP Networks, select the LAN under Local IP Networks, and click Edit) to achieve the desired result.

This is a dual-stacked implementation of IPv6, so IPv6 and IPv4 are used alongside each other. If you enable IPv6, the router will not allow connections via IPv4. When IPv6 is enabled, some router features are no longer supported. These are:

  • RADIUS/TACACS+ accounting for wireless clients and admin/CLI login
  • IP Passthrough (not needed with IPv6)
  • NAT (not needed with IPv6)
  • Bounce pages
  • UPnP
  • Network Mobility
  • DHCP Relay
  • VRRP, GRE, GRE over IPSec, OSPF, NHRP
  • Syslog
  • SNMP over the WAN (LAN works)

NOTE: Enabling WAN IPv6 does disable IPv4 functionality. Before enabling IPV6 Ensure your ISP is IPv6 capable.


Configuration

Configuration Difficulty: Expert
  • Step 1: Log into the router’s Setup Page. For help with logging in please click here.
  • Step 2:Select Connection Manager in the menu on the left and click the WAN connection to be modified and click the edit button.

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  • Step 3: In the window that opens select IPv6 Configuration and pull the IPv6 Connect Menu down to select the desired connection method.-There are two main types of IPv6 WAN connectivity: native (Auto and Static) and tunneling over IPv4 (6to4, 6in4, and 6rd).*
    • Native – (Auto and Static) The upstream ISP routes IPv6 packets directly.
    • IPv6 tunneling: (6to4, 6in4, and 6rd) Each IPv6 packet is encapsulated by the router in an IPv4 packet and routed over an IPv4 route to a tunnel endpoint that decapsulates it and routes the IPv6 packet natively. The reply is encapsulated by the tunnel endpoint in an IPv4 packet and routed back over an IPv4 route. Some tunnel modes do not require upstream ISPs to route or even be aware of IPv6 traffic at all. Some modes are utilized by upstream ISPs to simplify the configuration and roll-out of IPv6.

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  • Step 4: To enable IPv6, select the desired IPv6 connection method for this WAN interface.
    • Disabled (default) – IPv6 disabled on this interface.
    • Auto – IPv6 will use automatic connection settings (if available).
    • Static – Input a specific IPv6 address for your WAN connection. This is provided by the ISP if it is supported.
    • 6to4 Tunnel – Encapsulates the IPv6 data and transfers it to an automatic tunnel provider (if your ISP supports it).
    • 6in4 Tunnel – Encapsulates the IPv6 data and sends it to the configured tunnel provider.
    • 6rd Tunnel (IPv6 rapid deployment) – Encapsulates the IPv6 data and sends it to a relay server provided by your ISP.

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  • Step4: Configure your Connection method examples for each are below:
    • When you configure IPv6, you have the option to designate DNS Servers and Delegated Networks. Because of the dual-stack setup, these settings are optional: when configured for IPv6, the router will fall back to IPv4 settings when necessary.
    • Each WAN device is required to connect IPv4 before connecting IPv6. Because of this, DNS servers are optional, as most IPv4 DNS servers will respond with AAAA records (128-bit IPv6 DNS records, most commonly used to map hostnames to the IPv6 address of the host) if requested. If no IPv6 DNS servers are configured, the system will fall back to the DNS servers provided by the IPv4 configuration.
    • A delegated network is an IPv6 network that is inherently provided by or closely tied to a WAN IP configuration. The IPv6 model is for each device to have end-to-end IP connectivity without relying on any translation mechanism. In order to achieve this, each client device on the LAN network needs to have a publicly routable IPv6 address.

Configuration Examples

Auto

  • IPv6 auto-configuration mode uses DHCPv6 and/or SLAAC to configure the IPv6 networks. When you select Auto, all of the following settings are optional (depending on your provider’s requirements):
    • PD Request Size – Prefix Delegation request size. This is the size of IPv6 network that will be requested from the ISP to delegate to LAN networks. (Default: 63)
    • Primary IPv6 DNS Server – (optional) Depending on your provider, this may be required. This only takes effect if the default global DNS setting on the Network Settings → DNS page is “Automatic”.
    • Additional IPv6 DNS Server – Secondary DNS server.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – (optional) Network available for delegation to LANs. Depending on your provider, this may be required. Prefixes specified here only take effect if those supplied by the connection are insufficient to configure your LANs.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – Additional network available for delegation to LANs.

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Static

  • As with IPv4, static configuration is available for situations where the WAN IPv6 topology is fixed.
    • IPv6 Address/CIDR – Input the IPv6 static IP address and mask length provided by your ISP (see the IETF explanation of CIDR).
    • IPv6 Gateway IP – Input the IPv6 remote gateway IP address provided by your ISP.
    • Primary IPv6 DNS Server – (optional) Depending on your provider/setup, this may be required. This only takes effect if the default global DNS setting on the Networking → DNS Servers page is “Automatic”.
    • Additional IPv6 DNS Server – Secondary DNS server.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – (optional) Network available for delegation to LANs. Depending on your provider, this may be required. Prefixes specified here only take effect if those supplied by the connection are insufficient to configure your LANs.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – Additional network available for delegation to LANs.

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6to4 Tunnel

  • Out of the box, 6to4 is the simplest mode to enable full end-to-end IPv6 connectivity in an organization if the upstream ISP properly routes packets to and from the 6to4 unicast relay servers.
    • Primary IPv6 DNS Server – (optional) Depending on your provider, this may be required. This only takes effect if the default global DNS setting on the Network Settings → DNS page is “Automatic”.
    • Additional IPv6 DNS Server – Secondary DNS server.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – (optional) Network available for delegation to LANs. Depending on your provider, this may be required. Prefixes specified here only take effect if those supplied by the connection are insufficient to configure your LANs.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – Additional network available for delegation to LANs.

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6in4 Tunnel

  • The 6in4 tunnel mode utilizes explicit IPv4 tunnel endpoints and encapsulates IPv6 packets using 41 as the specified protocol type in the IP header. A 6in4 tunnel broker provides a static IPv4 server endpoint, decapsulates packets, and provides routing for both egress and ingress IPv6 packets. Most tunnel brokers provide a facility to request delegated networks for use through the tunnel.
    • Tunnel Server IP – Input the tunnel server IP address provided by your tunnel service.
    • Local IPv6 Address – Input the local IPv6 address provided by your tunnel service.
    • Primary IPv6 DNS Server – (optional) Depending on your provider, this may be required. This only takes effect if the default global DNS setting on the Network Settings → DNS page is “Automatic”.
    • Additional IPv6 DNS Server – Secondary DNS server.
    • ** Delegated IPv6 Network** – (optional) Network available for delegation to LANs. Depending on your provider, this may be required. Prefixes specified here only take effect if those supplied by the connection are insufficient to configure your LANs.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – Additional network available for delegation to LANs.

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6rd Tunnel

  • IPv6 Rapid Deployment (6rd) is a method of IPv6 site configuration derived from 6to4. It is different from 6to4 in that the ISP provides explicit 6rd infrastructure that handles the IPv4 ↔ IPv6 translation within the ISP network. 6rd is considered more reliable than 6to4 as the ISP explicitly maintains infrastructure to support tunneled IPv6 traffic over their IPv4 network.
    • 6rd Prefix – The 6rd prefix and prefix length should be supplied by your ISP.
    • IPv4 Border Router Address – This address should be supplied by your ISP.
    • IPv4 Common Prefix Mask – Input the number of common prefix bits that you can mask off of the WAN’s IPv4 address.
    • Primary IPv6 DNS Server – (optional) Depending on your provider, this may be required. This only takes effect if the default global DNS setting on the Network Settings → DNS page is “Automatic”.
    • Additional IPv6 DNS Server – Secondary DNS server.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – (optional) Network available for delegation to LANs. Depending on your provider, this may be required. Prefixes specified here only take effect if those supplied by the connection are insufficient to configure your LANs.
    • Delegated IPv6 Network – Additional network available for delegation to LANs.

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Category: Cradlepoint Series 3

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