FAQs

Sierra Wireless Products

The SIM slot is located on the front left (as you are looking at the side with the lights and the reset button) behind the plastic cover. To access the SIM slot on the device you must remove the plastic cover with a 2mm or 5/64″ hexagon Allen wrench. Install the SIM card with the gold contacts facing down and the cut-out facing to the right. The GX400/440 also includes a SIM lock-down feature to prevent the SIM from moving during extreme vibration. The cover has a tab to mechanically secure the SIM in place during extreme vibration. When replacing the cover, first place the front into the lip and push back to make sure the four holes are aligned before screwing the bolts back in place.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Designing a photovoltaic solar system destined to supply the energy needs of a transmitting and receive wireless radio modem involved elements very different than a system designed as grid tied, or to connect to AC power devices. The attached devices have low energy demands, energy remains in DC (no invertor is used to create AC power), panel mounting space is minimal, and environmental conditions can be harsh.

Choosing A Solar PV Panel

The Solar PV or photovoltaic panel harvests electricity from the sun. Quality and efficiency vary widely from manufacturer to manufacturer. Panels often use polycrystalline silicon, monocrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium telluride, and copper indium (di)selenide/sulfide (CIGS). CIGS has the highest absorption coefficient of solar modules and is useful in harvesting energy in sub-optimal conditions such as on cloudy and overcast days and has high efficiency and carry a high cost per watt. Monocrystalline thin film solar cells are often more expensive than multi-crystalline or polycrystalline based cells, but have a greater efficiency which is useful for wireless off-grid installations and provide a balanced price to performance.
While researching ratings be mindful of whether the wattage is rated as PTC or STC. PTC or PVUSA Test Conditions uses a known constant developed by NREL (National Renewable Energy Labs). STC, or Standard Test Conditions, uses a methodology which produces higher results. Generally PTC is held to be more reflective of real-world solar and climatic conditions.

Understand the efficiency of the panel. On a pole mounted system , an efficient panel should be used to ensure that the system can be powered by one or two panels.

The panel must have its performance characteristics available, and these should follow a know standard such as PTC mentioned above.

The panel needs to be paired with a proper solar charge controller. USAT technical service engineers can help differentiate the balance between panel productivity and charge controller efficiency. If you are limited on panel space, and have a heavy demand, then we need to maximize panel yield along with using a highly efficient Maximum Power Point Tracking charge controller. On a recent deployment USAT leveraged these performance attributes along with an optimal battery array to meet a DOT requirement of 10 days runtime, without sun.

Along with the panel size, the power demand must be taken into account. USAT has demand requirements in varying loads on transmitting and receives wireless radios such as those in the Sierra Wireless AirLink® Raven, Sierra Wireless AirLink® PinPoint, Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-400 and GX-440, Encore Bandit, Cradlepoint MBR and COR, Digi Connect, Digi WR, and Digi Transport, CalAmps, Multitech and Red Lion Sixnet Bluetree.

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The Sierra Wireless AirLink® products that support ALEOS Application Framework or AAF are the Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX440, the Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX400 and the Sierra Wireless AirLink® LS-300. USAT carries these products designed for the Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint carrier networks as well as through USAT’s Express M2M network services (ExpressM2M.com).

USAT has ALEOS Application Framework engineering teams on staff. Bring us your project for AAF, and we will bring intelligence to the edge for you.

You can view our Sierra Wireless AirLink GX440 and GX400 and LS300 products in the USAT web store.

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The Sierra Wireless AirLink Raven XT has been replaced by the Sierra Wireless AirLink LS300. The LS300 is a 3G modem that has an MSRP of $479.

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The LTE networks that supports the GX440 are the Verizon Wireless Network and the AT&T LTE Network in the US.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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The latest ALEOS software version for all Sierra Wireless GX400 and GX440 devices is currently 4.3.6.011 (as of 7/30/2014).

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Most anyone working in the utility industry is probably familiar with Modbus, a serial communications protocol typically used with PLCs (programmable logic controllers). Modbus is often used to connect a supervisory computer with a remote terminal unit (RTU) in SCADA systems. Did you also know that Sierra Wireless intelligent serial gateways feature Modbus support? Sierra Wireless AirLink® serial cellular gateways like the Raven X (V4228-V), GX400/440 and Raven XT (V2227-V) can be used in place of radios in a Modbus solution. In order to do this, you will need an AirLink® device for the host and an AirLink® device at each remote location. Each of these devices will also need to be properly configured. Once this is done correctly, the host (master) provides a single endpoint to poll all of the field devices (slaves). This functionality is extremely useful when trying to maintain compatibility with existing hardware and software, all while transitioning to a cellular network-driven solution.

USAT can assist in every facet of a solution such as this: the design, provisioning, configuration, and deployment. Contact USAT today for more information.

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ALEOS Application Framework (ALEOS AF) provides developers a complete set of building blocks and tools for creating applications that run inside Sierra Wireless AirLink GX gateways. ALEOS AF builds on the proven ALEOS built-in embedded intelligence and integrates with the AirVantage M2M Cloud Platform in order to offer developers and customers a platform for creating tailored end-to-end M2M solution.

ALEOS AF provides M2M and network protocol stacks, remote application and data management, access to existing ALEOS services, and direct access to hardware interfaces for building custom M2M applications.

ALEOS AF gets solutions to market faster, simplifies deployment, and allows for specialized features that yield cheaper and more focused solutions. Intelligence at the edge reduces hardware and communication costs by preprocessing and transmitting only necessary data.

For a visual introduction to what is ALEOS AF and what it enables please see the ALEOS AF video below.

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Sierra Wireless AirLink® has a platform called AirVantage. AirVantage has a powerful set of M2M application development tools and an open web services application programming interface (API) which can be leveraged in conjunction with ALEOS Application Framework (AAF) running inside of Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-400 and GX-440 intelligent wireless gateways. USAT Corp is a premier partner of Sierra Wireless authorized to to optimize AAF coding in Lua, so that the devices are shipped live to the field during with device deployment. USAT’s DevProv+ suite of services ensures maximum success with a deployment of equipment utilizing the AirVantage platform.

AirVantage can also function as a device management backbone, communicating directly with devices in the field through the AirVantage Ready Agent. This also provides advanced asset management features to issue commands to assets or collect asset data and events. AirVantage Platform also includes embedded and application development tools to expedite time to market. The eclipse based programming tools are tied to the AirVantage Ready Agent as well as the services platform in order to create a comprehensive M2M development environment. This environment includes embedded M2M modeling tools and application simulation tools.

Another facet of AirVantage is AirVantage Smart Automation. This platform simplifies the connection to industrial equipment and the creation of embedded business logic without programming. This enables new services such as tiered monitoring and maintenance, demand response applications, and time- or location-based equipment usage models.

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Four LEDs are visible from the front and top of the AirLink GX400. Labeled (from left to right) Network, Signal, Activity, and Power, each LED can display one of three colors: green, yellow, or red.

  • LED Operation:
  • Off – No activity
  • Green – Full function
  • Yellow – Limited Function
  • Red – Not functional
  • Blinking – Where needed, blinking is used to indicate altered functionality
  • Network LED:
  • Green – On the network
  • Flashing Green – Roaming
  • Yellow – Found service, attempting to connect
  • Flashing Yellow – Link down
  • Red – No data connection available
  • Signal LED – Light shows the strength of the signal and may be nearly solid
    (strong signal) or flashing (weaker signal). A slow flash indicates a very weak
    signal
  • Green – Good signal
  • Yellow – Marginal signal
  • Red – Bad signal
  • Flashing Red – No signal
  • ActivityLED – Pulse green on packet transmit/receive on radio link.
    Otherwise, LED is off
  • Power LED:
  • Off – No power (or above 36V or below 7.5V)
  • Red – System not operational
  • Green – Normal operation
  • Green, Occasional Yellow – GPS Lock
  • Yellow – Low power mode or system booting

Caution: If you need to reset the device configuration using the Reset button, hold the button depressed until the LEDs start cycling yellow, and then release the button.

Light Patterns

The LEDs on the front of the device respond with different light patterns to indicate device states.

    Normal – Each LED is lit as applicable

  • Start up and Device Reboot – All LEDS simultaneously cycle red, yellow, and green at the start. Various light patterns continue until the Power LED turns yellow, and then a solid green, to indicate an active device
  • Radio Passthrough (H/W) – Network LED is a solid red
  • Factory Reset – All LEDs cycle yellow back and forth when the Reset pin is briefly depressed and released. Returns the device’s software to the factory default state
  • Data Retry, Failed Auth, and Retrying – The Network LED blinks red every 3 seconds

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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IP (Ingress Protection) rating measures the rates and the degrees of protection provided against the intrusion of solid objects (including body parts like hands and fingers), dust, accidental contact, and water in mechanical casings and with electric enclosures. The first number of an IP rating represents the level of protection against “solid particle”, while the second number represents the level of protection against “liquid ingress”.
An IP rating of 64 indicates that the GX400/440:

  • 6 for solid particles – “No ingress of dust; complete protection against contact.” 6 is the highest rating for solid particle protection.
  • 4 for liquid ingress – Splashing Water; “Water splashing against the enclosure from any direction shall have no harmful effect.”

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Cloud services can be used for applications built around Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), or Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS).

Sierra Wireless AirLink® has a platform called AirVantage. AirVantage has a powerful set of M2M application development tools and an open web services application programming interface (API) which can be leveraged in conjunction with ALEOS Application Framework (AAF) running inside of Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-400 and GX-440 intelligent wireless gateways. USAT Corp is a premier partner of Sierra Wireless authorized to to optimize AAF coding in Lua, so that the devices are shipped live to the field during with device deployment. USAT’s DevProv+ suite of services ensures maximum success with a deployment of equipment utilizing the AirVantage platform.

AirVantage can also function as a device management backbone, communicating directly with devices in the field through the AirVantage Ready Agent. This also provides advanced asset management features to issue commands to assets or collect asset data and events. AirVantage Platform also includes embedded and application development tools to expedite time to market. The eclipse based programming tools are tied to the AirVantage Ready Agent as well as the services platform in order to create a comprehensive M2M development environment. This environment includes embedded M2M modeling tools and application simulation tools.

Another facet of AirVantage is AirVantage Smart Automation. This platform simplifies the connection to industrial equipment and the creation of embedded business logic without programming. This enables new services such as tiered monitoring and maintenance, demand response applications, and time- or location-based equipment usage models.

Smart Automation leverages the AirVantage Platform to facilitate subscription, device and asset management through a remote M2M application. The Smart Automation extension integrates these capabilities with industrial control systems. AirVantage Smart Automation makes it easy to set up custom business logic to collect, sort, prioritize, send and store data without the need for programming. Existing backend systems can be integrated or new M2M applications can be implemented using standard web services APIs.

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Yes, the Sierra Wireless AirLink® LS300 is RoHS Certified. The M2M modem is branded with an RoHS sticker on the modem, and USAT has a certificate of compliance on file from Sierra Wireless for the AirLink® LS300 RoHS Certification (available on request). The certificate is a DECLARATION OF EUROPEAN UNION RoHS COMPLIANT PRODUCT, and that Sierra Wireless Inc certifies that the products identified below to be “”RoHS Compliant””:

Sierra Wireless AirLink® LS300 Modem

Restriction of Hazard Substances (or RoHS) compliant defines that the product conforms to the requirements of the European Union’s restriction on use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment’s directive,2002/95/EC (RoHS directive) which limits the content of the following elements:

  • Lead (Pb)
  • Mercury (Hg)
  • Cadmium (Cd)
  • Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)
  • Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB)
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE)

Hexavalent chromium is used in primers, chrome coatings and chrome plating.

PBB and PBDE are used in plastics as flame retardants.

The RoHS directive is with respect to any homogenous components used in the product as shipped by Sierra Wireless, in its entirety.

The RoHS directive is vitally important for USAT’s clients in the European Union, global carrier partners such as Vodafone and AT&T, as well as North American enterprises with sales and offices in Europe. RoHS is also an environmental sustainability directive which USAT is proud that our suppliers, such as Sierra Wireless, support.

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Yes, the Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-440 is RoHS Certified. The M2M modem is branded with an RoHS sticker on the modem, and USAT has a certificate of compliance on file from Sierra Wireless for the AirLink® GX-440 RoHS Certification (available on request). The certificate is a DECLARATION OF EUROPEAN UNION RoHS COMPLIANT PRODUCT, and that Sierra Wireless Inc certifies that the products identified below to be “”RoHS Compliant””:

Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX440 Modem

Restriction of Hazard Substances (or RoHS) compliant defines that the product conforms to the requirements of the European Union’s restriction on use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment’s directive,2002/95/EC (RoHS directive) which limits the content of the following elements:

  • Lead (Pb)
  • Mercury (Hg)
  • Cadmium (Cd)
  • Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)
  • Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB)
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE)

Hexavalent chromium is used in primers, chrome coatings and chrome plating.

PBB and PBDE are used in plastics as flame retardants.

The RoHS directive is with respect to any homogenous components used in the product as shipped by Sierra Wireless, in its entirety.

The RoHS directive is vitally important for USAT’s clients in the European Union, global carrier partners such as Vodafone and AT&T, as well as North American enterprises with sales and offices in Europe. RoHS is also an environmental sustainability directive which USAT is proud that our suppliers, such as Sierra Wireless, support.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Yes, the Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-400 is RoHS Certified. The M2M modem is branded with an RoHS sticker on the modem, and USAT has a certificate of compliance on file from Sierra Wireless for the AirLink® GX-400 RoHS Certification (available on request). The certificate is a DECLARATION OF EUROPEAN UNION RoHS COMPLIANT PRODUCT, and that Sierra Wireless Inc certifies that the products identified below to be “”RoHS Compliant””:

Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX400 Modem

Restriction of Hazard Substances (or RoHS) compliant defines that the product conforms to the requirements of the European Union’s restriction on use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment’s directive,2002/95/EC (RoHS directive) which limits the content of the following elements:

  • Lead (Pb)
  • Mercury (Hg)
  • Cadmium (Cd)
  • Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)
  • Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB)
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE)

Hexavalent chromium is used in primers, chrome coatings and chrome plating.

PBB and PBDE are used in plastics as flame retardants.

The RoHS directive is with respect to any homogenous components used in the product as shipped by Sierra Wireless, in its entirety.

The RoHS directive is vitally important for USAT’s clients in the European Union, global carrier partners such as Vodafone and AT&T, as well as North American enterprises with sales and offices in Europe. RoHS is also an environmental sustainability directive which USAT is proud that our suppliers, such as Sierra Wireless, support.

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The Sierra Wireless GX400/440 has two visible Ethernet LEDs on the rear panel of the GX400 and GX440 devices:

  • Left LED (Activity) – Blinks Yellow when there is activity
  • Right LED (Link Speed):
    • Green – 100 Mbps
    • Orange – 10 Mbps

AirLink GX400 + GX440 FAQ

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If the AirLink® GX400/GX440 is used in a vehicle or battery-powered application, the red wire should be connected to battery power and the black wire to ground. The white low-power timer enable wire must be connected to either unswitched or switched power for the GX400/GX440.

  • Red = Power
  • Black = Ground
  • White = Low-Power timer enable wire (Ignition Sense)
  • Green = Digital I/O

PLEASE NOTE: If the white lower-power wire is not used, it must be tied into the red wire. Otherwise, the device will not power on.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Briefly press the Reset button to initiate a power up or reboot. All LEDs turn Red, then Yellow, then Green, and then light in the configurations below. After the kernel has booted, while the ALEOS software is initializing, the Power LED turns Yellow, then Green, and the Network LED will flash Yellow, change to a solid Yellow, and finally turn Green.

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The Sierra Wireless GX400/440 can be reset to factory defaults by pressing and holding the “Reset” button continuously for 7 – 8 seconds. When all LEDs start flashing Yellow, release the Reset button and the unit will re-boot with the factory default options.

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Sierra Wireless AirLink devices for AT&T or Verizon Wireless LTE do not come standard with a SIM card installed. This means that in order to be operate on a cellular network, SIM cards must be installed. With most cellular modem devices this is not a complex procedure, with the exception of Sierra Wireless GX400s or GX440s with WiFi or any other GX with an expansion card installed.

When the aforementioned AirLink® GX-series devices with X-cards are concerned, (WiFi, i/o, serial, ethernet),  is highly recommended that you opt to have USAT perform the SIM insertion on your behalf, which we do standard as a part of the DevProv+ suite of services, or for a nominial “SIM insertion” fee. If you face extenuating circumstances where this is not an option, follow the instructions below.

 

 

 

 

Installing a SIM in a GX Wi-Fi
X-Card Enabled Device:

 

 

USAT highly recommends that SIM
integration on GX Wi-Fi X-Card enabled devices be performed by an authorized
service center such as USAT.  USAT
includes SIM integration at no additional charge with our DevProv+ service
packages. 

 

 

While we highly recommend this service be performed
by USAT, we understand that some customers may want to integrate an existing
SIM upon receipt of their new GX400/440 device with the Wi-Fi X-Card. 

 

 

Below are the basic steps for
integration.  Extra care should be taken as damage to the X-Card or modem that occurs
during SIM insertion is outside of the manufacturer’s warranty coverage.

 

The SIM slot is located on the front left
(as you are looking at the side with the lights and the reset button) behind
the plastic cover. To access the SIM slot on the device you must remove the
plastic cover.

 

 

Step 1: Unplug your GX400/440 from power source.

 

 

Step 2: Remove the four hex screws on top of the unit (used to secure the
black cover). Place screws in a safe spot, these screws will be used again.

 

                Step 3: Remove the nut and washer from the front facing SMA connector. Place
nut and    washer in a safe spot, these will be used again.

 

                Step 4: Slide the top black cover off of the device.


            Step 5: Install the SIM card with the gold contacts facing down and the
cut-out facing to the right.

 

 

 

 

Re-Installing The Cover for a GX
Wi-Fi X-Card Enabled Device:

 

 

The cover has
a tab to mechanically secure the SIM in place during extreme vibration. When
replacing the cover:

Step 1: Install the black cover by lining up the SMA antenna connector with
the hole in the cover, tilt the rear of the cover slightly to make sure the
front bottom of the cover seats in the front ridge, and then push the top of
the cover down.

 

Step 2: Re-install the 4 hex screws on top of the unit.

 

                Step 3: Place the lock washer onto the SMA antenna connector and push to the
face of the cover.


            Step 4: Install then tighten nut.

 

If you are a USAT client, you may contact USAT Corp. with any points of clarification that you may need.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

 

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 The router can establish an uplink via Ethernet, WiFi as WAN, or 3G/4G modems (integrated or external USB). If the primary WAN connection fails, the router will automatically attempt to bring up a new link on another device: this feature is called failover. If Load Balance is enabled, multiple WAN devices may establish a link concurrently.

WAN Interfaces

This is a list of the available interfaces used to access the Internet. You can enable, stop, or start devices from this section. By using the priority arrows (the arrows in the boxes to the left – these show if you have more than one available interface), you can set the interface the router uses by default and the order that it allows failover.

In the example shown, Ethernet is set as the primary Internet source, while a 4G LTE modem is attached for failover. The Ethernet is “Connected” while the LTE modem is “Available” for failover. A WiFi-as-WAN interface is also attached and “Available”.

  • Load Balance: If this is enabled, the router will use multiple WAN interfaces to increase the data transfer throughput by using any connected WAN interface consecutively. Selecting Load Balance will automatically start the WAN interface and add it to the pool of WAN interfaces to use for data transfer. Turning off Load Balance for an active WAN interface may require the user to restart any current browsing session.
  • Enabled: Selected by default. Deselect to disable an interface.

Click on the small box at the top of the list to select/deselect all devices for either Load Balance or Enabled.

Click on a device in the list to reveal additional information about that device.

Selecting a device reveals the following information:

  • State (Connected, Available, etc.)
  • Port
  • UID (Unique identifier. This could be a name or number/letter combination.)
  • IP Address
  • Gateway
  • Netmask
  • Stats: bytes in, bytes out
  • Uptime

Click “Edit” to view configuration options for the selected device. For 3G/4G modems, click “Control” to view options to activate or update the device.

WAN Configuration

Select a WAN interface and click on Edit to open the WAN Configuration editor. The tabs available in this editor are specific to the particular WAN interface types.

General Settings

Device Settings
  • Enabled: Select/deselect to enable/disable.
  • Force NAT: Normally NAT is part of the Routing Mode setting which is selected on the LAN side in Network Settings → WiFi / Local Networks. Select this option to force NAT whenever this WAN device is being used.
  • Priority: This number controls failover and failback order. The lower the number, the higher the priority and the more use the device will get. This number will change when you move devices around with the priority arrows in the WAN Interfaces list.
  • Load Balance: Select to allow this device to be available for the Load Balance pool.
  • Download bandwidth: Defines the default download bandwidth for use in Load Balance and QoS (quality of service, or traffic shaping) algorithms. (Range: 128 Kb/s to 1 Gb/s.)
  • Upload bandwidth: Defines the default upload bandwidth for use in Load Balance and QoS (quality of service, or traffic shaping) algorithms. (Range: 128 Kb/s to 1 Gb/s.)
  • MTU: Maximum transmission unit. This is the size of the largest protocol data unit that the device can pass. (Range: 46 to 1500 Bytes.)
  • Hostname (This only shows for certain devices.)
IPv4 Failure Check (Advanced)

If this is enabled, the router will check that the highest priority active WAN interface can get to the Internet even if the WAN connection is not actively being used. If the interface goes down, the router will switch to the next highest priority interface available. If this is not selected, the router will still failover to the next highest priority interface but only after the user has attempted to get out to the Internet and failed.

Idle Check Interval: The amount of time between each check. (Default: 30 seconds. Range: 10-3600 seconds.)

Monitor while connected: (Default: Off) Select from the following dropdown options:

  • Passive DNS (modem only): The router will take no action until data is detected that is destined for the WAN. When this data is detected, the data will be sent and the router will check for received data for 2 seconds. If no data is received the router behaves as described below under Active DNS.
  • Active DNS (modem only): A DNS request will be sent to the DNS servers. If no data is received, the DNS request will be retried 4 times at 5-second intervals. (The first 2 requests will be directed at the Primary DNS server and the second 2 requests will be directed at the Secondary DNS server.) If still no data is received, the device will be disconnected and failover will occur.
  • Active Ping: A ping request will be sent to the Ping Target. If no data is received, the ping request will be retried 4 times at 5-second intervals. If still no data is received, the device will be disconnected and failover will occur. When “Active Ping” is selected, the next line gives an estimate of data usage in this form: “Active Ping could use as much as 9.3 MB of data per month.” This amount depends on the Idle Check Interval.
  • Off: Once the link is established the router takes no action to verify that it is still up.

Ping IP Address: If you selected “Active Ping”, you will need to input an IP address. This must be an address that can be reached through your WAN connection (modem/Ethernet). Some ISPs/Carriers block certain addresses, so choose an address that all of your WAN connections can use. For best results, select an established public IP address. For example, you might ping Google Public DNS at 8.8.8.8 or Level 3 Communications at 4.2.2.2.

IPv6 Failure Check (Advanced)

The settings for IPv6 Failure Check match those for IPv4 Failure Check except that the IP address for Active Ping is an IPv6 address.

Failback Configuration (Advanced)

This is used to configure failback, which is the ability to go back to a higher priority WAN interface if it regains connection to its network.

Select the Failback Mode from the following options:

  • Usage
  • Time
  • Disabled

Usage: Fail back based on the amount of data passed over time. This is a good setting for when you have a dual-mode EVDO/WiMAX modem and you are going in and out of WiMAX coverage. If the router has failed over to EVDO it will wait until you have low data usage before bringing down the EVDO connection to check if a WiMAX connection can be made.

  • High (Rate: 80 KB/s. Time Period: 30 seconds.)
  • Normal (Rate: 20 KB/s. Time Period: 90 seconds.)
  • Low (Rate: 10 KB/s. Time Period: 240 seconds.)
  • Custom (Rate range: 1-100 KB/s. Time Period range: 10-300 seconds.)

Time: Fail back only after a set period of time. (Default: 90 seconds. Range: 10-300 seconds.) This is a good setting if you have a primary wired WAN connection and only use a modem for failover when your wired connection goes down. This ensures that the higher priority interface has remained online for a set period of time before it becomes active (in case the connection is dropping in and out, for example).

Disabled: Deactivate failback mode.

Immediate Mode: Fail back immediately whenever a higher priority interface is plugged in or when there is a priority change. Immediate failback returns you to the use of your preferred Internet source more quickly which may have advantages such as reducing the cost of a failover data plan, but it may cause more interruptions in your network than Usage or Time modes.

IP Overrides

IP overrides allow you to override IP settings after a device’s IP settings have been configured.

Only the fields that you fill out will be overridden. Override any of the following fields:

  • IP Address
  • Subnet Mask
  • Gateway IP
  • Primary DNS Server
  • Secondary DNS Server

IPv6 Settings

IPv6 is disabled by default. To learn about configuration options for IPv6, see this article.

Ethernet Settings

While default settings for each WAN Ethernet port will be sufficient in most circumstances, you have the ability to control the following:

  • Connect Method: DHCP (Automatic), Static (Manual), or PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet).
  • MAC Address: You have the ability to change the MAC address, but typically this is unnecessary. You can match this address with your device’s address by clicking: “Clone Your PC’s MAC Address”.

Connect Method

Select the connection type that you need for this WAN connection. You may need to check with your ISP or system administrator for this information.

  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is the most common configuration. Your router’s Ethernet ports are automatically configured for DHCP connection. DHCP automatically assigns dynamic IP addresses to devices in your networks. This is preferable in most circumstances.
  • Static allows you to input a specific IP address for your WAN connection; this should be provided by the ISP if supported.
  • PPPoE should be configured with the username, password, and other settings provided by your ISP.

If you want to use a Static (Manual) or PPPoE connection, you will need to fill out additional information.

Static (Manual):

  • IPv4 Address
  • Subnet Mask
  • Gateway IP
  • Primary DNS Server
  • Secondary DNS Server

PPPoE:

  • Username
  • Password
  • Password Confirm
  • Service
  • Auth Type: None, PAP, or CHAP

Modem Settings

Not all modems will have all of the options shown below; the available options are specific to the modem type.

On Demand: When this mode is selected a connection to the Internet is made as needed. When this mode is not selected a connection to the Internet is always maintained.

IP WAN Subnet Filter: This feature will filter out any packets going to the modem that do not match the network (address and netmask).

Aggressive Reset: When Aggressive Reset is enabled the system will attempt to maintain a good modem connection. If the Internet has been unreachable for a period of time, a reset of the modem will occur in attempt to re-establish the connection.

Automatically check for new firmware: (Default: selected) The modem will automatically check for firmware updates by default.

Enable Aux Antenna: (Default: selected) Enable or disable the modem’s auxiliary diversity antenna. This should normally be left enabled.

GPS Signal Source: Select the antenna to be used for receiving GPS coordinates. Some products support a dedicated GPS antenna, while others use the auxiliary diversity antenna only (and some products support both).

Enable eHRPD: (Default: selected) Enable or disable the modem’s ability to connect via eHRPD (enhanced High Rate Packet Data) when connecting to a 3G EVDO network on Sprint. eHRPD routes EVDO traffic through the LTE systems, enabling easy transitions between LTE and EVDO. In rare cases it may make sense to bypass the LTE core, so this field allows you to disable eHRPD.

Modem Connection Mode: Specify how the modem should connect to the network. Not all options are available for all modems; this will default to Auto if an incompatible mode is selected.

  • Auto (all modes): Let the modem decide which network to use.
  • Auto 3G (3G or less): Let the modem decide which 2G or 3G network to use. Do not attempt to connect to LTE.
  • Force LTE: Connect to LTE only and do not attempt to connect to 3G or WiMAX.
  • Force WiMAX: Connect to WiMAX only and do not attempt to connect tot 3G or LTE.
  • Force 3G (EVDO, UMTS, HSPA): Connect to 3G network only.
  • Force 2G (1xRTT, EDGE, GPRS): Connect to 2G network only.

Network Selection Mode: Wireless carriers are assigned unique network identifying codes known as PLMN (Public Land Mobile Network). To manually select a particular carrier, select the Manual radio button and enter the network PLMN. Choose from the following options:

  • None/No Change
  • Auto: Selected by default
  • Home only
  • Manual: Input the PLMN code

Functional Mode: Selects the functional mode of the modem. IPPT (IP passthrough) mode causes the modem to act as a transport, passing Internet data and IP address information between the modem and the Internet directly. NAT mode causes the modem to NAT the IP address information. Consequently, IPPT mode does not allow user access to the modem web UI and NAT mode does allow user access to the modem web UI.

  • None/No Change
  • IPPT
  • NAT

Network-Initiated Alerts: This field controls whether the Sprint network can disconnect the modem to apply updates, such as for PRL, modem firmware, or configuration events. These activities do not change any router settings, but the modem connection may be unavailable for periods of time while these updates occur. The modem may also require a reset after a modem firmware update is complete.

  • Disabled: The request to update will be refused.
  • When Disconnected: The request to update will only be performed when the modem is either in a disconnected state or dormant state. If the modem is not in one of these states when the request is received, then the router will remember the request and perform the update when the modem becomes disconnected/dormant.
  • On Schedule: The request to update will only be performed at the specified scheduled time, no matter what the state of the modem is.

Network-Initiated Schedule: When you select “On Schedule” for Network-Initiated Alerts, you also select a time from this dropdown list. Modem updates will take place at this scheduled time.

AT Config Script: Enter the AT commands to be used for carrier specific modem configuration settings. Each command must be entered on a separate line. The command and associated response will be logged, so you should check the system log to make sure there were no errors.

NOTE: AT Config Script should not be used unless told to do so by your modem’s cellular provider or by a support technician.

AT Dial Script: Enter the AT commands to be used in establishing a network connection. Each command must be entered on a separate line. All command responses must include “OK”, except the final command response, which must include “CONNECT”.

Example:

AT
ATDT*99***2#

WiMAX Settings

WiMAX Realm: Select from the following dropdown options:

  • Clear – clearwire-wmx.net
  • Rover – rover-wmx.net
  • Sprint 3G/4G – sprintpcs.com
  • Xohm –xohm.com
  • BridgeMAXX – bridgeMAXX.com
  • Time Warner Cable – mobile.rr.com
  • Comcast – mob.comcast.net

TTLS Authentication Mode: TTLS inner authentication protocol. Select from the following dropdown options:

  • MSCHAPv2/MD5 (Microsoft Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol version2/Message-Digest Algorithm 5)
  • PAP (Password Authentication Protocol)
  • CHAP (Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol)

TTLS Username: Username for TTLS authentication.

TTLS Password: Password for TTLS authentication.

WiMAX Authentication Identity: User ID on the network. Leave this blank unless your provider tells you otherwise.

CDMA Settings

These settings are usually specific to your wireless carrier’s private networks. You should not set these unless directed to by a carrier representative. If a field below is left blank, that particular setting will not be changed in the modem. You should only fill in fields that are required by your carrier.

  • Persist Settings: If this is not checked, these settings will only be in place until the router is rebooted or the modem is unplugged.
  • Active Profile: Select a number from 0-5 from the dropdown list.

The following fields can be left blank. If left blank they will remain unchanged in the modem.

  • NAI (Username@realm): Network Access Identifier. NAI is a standard system of identifying users who attempt to connect to a network.
  • AAA Shared Secret (Password): “Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting” password.
  • Verify AAA Shared Secret
  • HA Shared Secret: “Home Agent” shared secret.
  • Primary HA
  • Secondary HA
  • AAA SPI: AAA Security Parameter Index.
  • HA SPI: HA Security Parameter Index.

SIM/APN/Auth Settings

SIM PIN: PIN number for a GSM modem with a locked SIM.

Authentication Protocol: Set this only if your service provider requires a specific protocol and the Auto option chooses the wrong one. Choose from AutoPAP, and CHAP and then input your username and password.

Access Point Configuration: Some wireless carriers provide multiple Access Point configurations that a modem can connect to. Some APN examples are ‘isp.cingular” and “vpn.com”.

  • Default: Let the router choose an APN automatically.
  • Default Override: Enter an APN by hand.
  • Select: This opens a table with 16 slots for APNs, each of which can be set as IP, IPV4V6, or IPV6. The default APN is marked with an asterisk (*). You can change the APN names, select a different APN, etc. For Verizon modems, only the third slot is editable. Changes made here are written to the modem, so a factory reset of the router will not impact these settings.

Update/Activate a Modem

Some 3G/4G modems can be updated and activated while plugged into the router. Updates and activation methods vary by modem model and service provider. Possible methods are: PRL Update, Activation, and FUMO. All supported methods will be displayed when you select your modem and click “Control” to open the “Update/Activate” window. If no methods are displayed for your device then you will need to update and activate your device externally.

To update or activate a modem, select the modem in the WAN Interfaces table and click “Control”.

The modem does not support Update/Activate methods: A message will state that there is no support for PRL Update, Activation, or FUMO.

The modem supports Update/Activate methods: A message will display showing options for each supported method:

  • Modem Activation / Update: Activate, Reactivate, or Upgrade Configuration.
  • Preferred Roaming List (PRL) Update
  • Firmware Update Management Object (FUMO)

Click the appropriate icon to start the process.

If the modem is connected when you start an operation the router will automatically disconnect it. The router may start another modem as a failover measure. When the operation is done the modem will go back to an idle state, at which point the router may restart it depending on failover and failback settings.

NOTE: Only one operation is supported at a time. If you try to start the same operation on the same modem twice the UI will not report failure and the request will finish normally when the original request is done. However if you try to start a different operation or use a different modem, this second request will fail without interfering with the pending operation.

Process Timeout: If the process fails an error message will display.

Activation has a 3-minute timeout, PRL update has a 4-minute timeout, and FUMO has a 10-minute timeout.

Update Modem Firmware

Click on the Firmware button to open the Modem Firmware Upgrade window. This will show whether there is new modem firmware available.

If you select Automatic (Internet) the firmware will be updated automatically. Use Manual Firmware Upgrade to instead manually upload firmware from a local computer or device.

Reset the Modem

Click on the Reset button to power cycle the modem. This will have the same effect as unplugging the modem.

Configuration Rules (Advanced)

This section allows you to create general rules that apply to the Internet connections of a particular type. These can be general or very specific. For example, you could create a rule that applies to all 3G/4G modems, or a rule that only applies to an Internet source with a particular MAC address.

The Configuration Rules list shows all rules that you have created, as well as all of the default rules. These are listed in the order they will be applied. The most general rules are listed at the top, and the most specific rules are at the bottom. The router goes down the list and applies all rules that fit for attached Internet sources. Configuration settings farther down the list will override previous settings.

Select any of these rules and click “Edit” to change the settings for a rule. To create a new rule, click “Add.”

WAN Configuration Rule Editor

After clicking “Add” or “Edit,” you will see a popup with the following tabs:

  • Filter Criteria
  • General Settings
  • IP Overrides
  • IPv6 Settings
  • Ethernet Settings
  • Modem Settings
  • WiMAX Settings
  • CDMA Settings
  • SIM/APN/Auth Settings

Filter Criteria

If you are creating a new rule, begin by setting the Filter Criteria . Create a name for your rule and the condition for which the rule applies:

  • Rule Name: Create a name meaningful to you. This name is optional.

Make a selection for “When,” “Condition,” and “Value” to create a condition for your rule. The condition will be in the form of these examples:

When Condition Value
Port is USB Port 1
Type is not WiMAX
  • When:
    • Port – Select by the physical port on the router that you are plugging the modem into (e.g., “USB Port 2”).
    • Manufacturer – Select by the modem manufacturer, such as Sierra Wireless.
    • Model – Set your rule according to the specific model of modem.
    • Type – Select by type of Internet source (Ethernet, LTE, Modem, Wireless as WAN, WiMAX).
    • Serial Number – Select 3G or LTE modem by the serial number.
    • MAC Address – Select WiMAX modem by MAC Address.
    • Unique ID – Select by ID. This is generated by the router and displayed when the device is connected to the router.
  • Condition: Select “is,” “is not,” “starts with,” “contains,” or “ends with” to create your condition’s statement.
  • Value: If the correct values are available, select from the dropdown list. You may need to manually input the value.

Once you have established the condition for your configuration rule, choose from the other tabs to set the desired configuration. All of the tabs have the same configuration options shown above in the WAN Configuration section (i.e., the options for Configuration Rules are the same as they are for individual devices).

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The intelligent wireless gateway and router, often referred to as a wireless modem, is perfect for connecting where there is no wireline data available. Therefore it is logical to connect the wireless wide area network modem where there is no grid electric readily available as well. The solution is to harvest energy from the sun using solar photovoltaic cells. Wireless gateways use very small amounts of electricity, and they often run on DC power, the same direct current electric we can generate from solar PV arrays. USAT architects and assembles single panel systems designed to use a pole mounted panel, a NEMA enclosure, and a battery array to power a wireless modem and connected equipment.

It is important to consider what equipment will be attached along with the wireless modem/intelligent gateway. Consult with your USAT sales representative before selecting attached equipment as disparate voltages, native AC powered devices, and high draw equipment can force the solar assembly to be oversized and cost prohibitive. For example, if you need to attach an IP Pan-Tilt-Zoom camera to the off-grid system, USAT can suggest low current PTZ cameras that work well with solar assemblies. A similar example is with network switches. Switches designed for 12Vdc or 24Vdc or POE systems should be selected, and these should be rated for a broad operating temperature, for example -40C to +60C. Other equipment frequently used are radar, sensors including pressure sensors, accelerometers, humidistats, temperature sensors, digital signage, and devices attached to RTC (real-time control) type controllers. Cisco routers that rely on the Cisco Wireless HWIC are generally not optimal for off-grid deployments due to their energy requirements.

USAT has modeled the solar design characteristics for wireless gateways and modems including the Sierra Wireless AirLink® Raven, Sierra Wireless AirLink® PinPoint, Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-400, Sierra Wireless AirLink® GX-440, Encore Bandits, Cradlepoint COR and MBR, Digi Connect, Digi WR, and Digi Transport, CalAmp, Multitech and Red Lion Sixnet Bluetree.

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There are 2 ways to add/purchase Sierra Wireless X-Cards. They can be procured:

Manufacturer Direct: Card installed at Sierra Wireless at time of purchase

Purchased and Installed by USATCORP. USAT is an authorized distributor and integrator of Sierra Wireless X-Cards. By going through USAT you will remove the hassle of integration and have the peace of mind that your warranty has not been voided.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Yes, both the Sierra Wireless GX400 and 440 support the use of X-Cards. The expansion card slot is designed to greatly increase the versatility of the platform.

  • WiFi XCard that will enable a WiFi (802.11 b/g/n) hotspot (access point) and support WiFi client mode

Two additional X-Cards are slated to be released in 2012. These cards will

  • Support additional Ethernet Ports
  • Expand I/O (inputs and outputs)

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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The Sierra Wireless GX440 is a 4G WWAN LTE router. AT&T and Verizon’s 4G LTE service requires the use of a SIM card. USAT stocks AT&T SIM cards. The AT&T SIM card can be procured & activated by USAT the time of purchase.

Through the procurement of USAT’s DevProv+ suite the device and SIM can be activated on the AT&T network. Additionally, USAT’s DevProv+ suite allows for network authentication, special template loads and device management prior to shipment.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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The only GX400 device that requires a SIM card is the Sierra Wireless GX400 for HSPA+ (AT&T/T-Mobile). The AT&T SIM card can be procured & activated by USAT the time of purchase.

Through the procurement of USAT’s DevProv+ suite the device and SIM can be activated on the AT&T network. Additionally, USAT’s DevProv+ suite allows for network authentication, special template loads and device management prior to shipment.

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The Sierra Wireless GX400 on Verizon and Sprint is tailored for their EVDO networks and does NOT require a SIM card. Device activation can be performed by working with your USAT Sales Manager.

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The Sierra Wireless LS300 is designed to a very compact form factor while still providing serial, USB, and Ethernet connections, along with full support for ALEOS and ALEOS Application Framework (AAF).
As of the LS-300 product release the space requirements for 4G-LTE radio modules will not allow the LS300 to support 4G-LTE data connectivity. Currently the Sierra Wireless AirLink GX-440 M2M modem supports 4G-LTE through major carriers including Verizon, Sprint and AT&T. Note that while the LS-400 does not currently support 4G-LTE or 4G Long Term Evolution it does support the HSPA+ standard which is marketed by AT&T and T-Mobile in the US as “4G” and used by worldwide GSM carriers including Vodafone.

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Yes. The AirLink GX400 can be configured to monitor the input, respond to specific types of events, and even trigger digital output. The device can also be configured to change its power mode in order to conserve power. These features can be configured to your needs.

The AirLink GX400 is equipped with an I/O port interface which includes 1 low power timer enable input and 1 digital I/O. These may be connected to sensors and switches to monitor status and remotely control equipment. AirLink GX400 board supports a low power timer enable input pin and a digital I/O pin which are connected to the CPU processor. The I/O signal comes in from the power connector, through a PolySwitch resettable fuse, and ties into the CPU pins with protection circuitry.

Digital Input

Digital Input can be used in two different modes: the switch mode or the voltage sensing mode.

The switch mode senses contact closures. The digital input can report either an open or closed state, and can be wired to a ground signal via a switch. When the switch is open, the input reads “”3.3V””. When the switch is closed, the input reads “”OV””.

Examples of using the input with a switch to ground:

  • When a door or other latch is opened or closed
  • Counting pulses or other electronic events
  • When a gauge reaches a certain point
  • When a container fills or empties
  • When a switch or valve is opened or closed
  • When the tow bar is raised or lowered
  • Connected to a sensor, the level of fuel in a vehicle
  • When the trunk of a vehicle is opened or closed
  • When the ignition is turned on or off

Digital Output

Digital Output of open collector design is capable of driving an external device such as a pull-up resistor or relay. As an example, a relay could be connected between the output pin and an external voltage. The voltage on the relay cannot exceed 30V. The digital output pin can handle up to 150mA.

Examples of using the digital output with an external relay or pull-up resistor:

  • Setting off an alarm or siren
  • Triggering a process to start on another device
  • Opening or closing a valve or switch
  • Locking or unlocking a door. Inputt
  • Turning a light on or off
  • Opening the vehicle’s trunk or doors

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Yes, the GX440 fully supports fallback to 3G and 2G networks. The default setting for the GX440, when it comes to network service preference, is “”LTE Preferred””, meaning the GX440 will always look to connect to a LTE service first, if available. If LTE service is not available, then the GX440 will connect to the next fastest service available.

Customers who purchase the GX440, but who do not yet have LTE service in their area, there is a configuration option under the “”WAN/Cellular”” tab in ACEmanager 4.0 to set the GX440 to “”CDMA Only””. When this configuration is used the GX440 will not actively scan for LTE service.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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No While the GX440 LTE devices does use an APN, that APN will be automatically loaded into the device by the Verizon Wireless network at time of initial device provisioning.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Please see updated Information Here

The Sierra Wireless GX400 and GX440 have an additional antenna port for Rx Diversity. Rx Diversity is designed to improve the quality of the downlink signal by essentially enabling the device to “choose” the best available signal. Rx diversity has been shown to improve signal quality. However, many customers decide to forego the expense of the 2nd antenna and rely on one Rx signal. Rx Diversity is set to “”ON”” by default in ALEOS, but if you decide to not use a 2nd antenna it’s vital to change the ALEOS setting for Rx Diversity to “OFF”. This setting can be found under the “WAN/Cellular” tab in ACEmanager 4.0.

The GX440 (LTE) utilizes 2×2 MIMO technology. MIMO equals Multi-In/Multi-out and is designed to improve the cellular signal and quality on both the down-link and up-link. MIMO for LTE works differently than Rx Diversity in that it utilizes 2 distinct Tx and Rx signals which are intelligently combined to increase throughput where signal multipath is available. MIMO will increase throughput in areas where interference would otherwise cause throughput degradation. Our recommendation is that 2 antennas be used for optimal performance. A single antenna may be used, however with one antenna you will not receive full MIMO benefits and your antenna performance may not be optimized. It is up to the user to determine if two antennas are beneficial, as multi-path is determined by local topology. There is no option to turn MIMO off in the GX440 since MIMO is a requirement of LTE.

Please contact your USAT Sales Manager for help identifying your best antenna options and to learn more about our custom cable assemblies and jumpers.

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Yes, it will work, but not at LTE speeds. It will fall back to HSPA. For LTE speeds a GX440 must be procured.

Please contact us and let’s know if we can be of additional help.

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No A Verizon 4G LTE SIM will not work in a devices designated for the AT&T network. Conversely, an AT&T 4G LTE SIM will not work in a Verizon designated device. SIM’s must be paired with devices designed to operate on their network. Please contact your USAT Sales Manager if you have any questions concerning network interchangeability.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Yes, you can get a Static IP on the Verizon Wireless Network, contact an USAT sales representative or a Verizon Wireless representative or reseller to learn more about this process.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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The Windows client version of ACEmanager will not work with the Sierra Wireless GX400 or GX440. The appropriate tool for one-to-one local, or remote, management of the GX400 or GX440 is ACEmanager 4.0.

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1-Wire devices enable combinations of memory, mixed signal, and secure authentication functions via a single contact serial interface. According to Wikipedia …1-Wire is a device communications bus system designed by Dallas Semiconductor Corp. that provides low-speed data, signaling, and power over a single signal. 1-Wire is typically used to communicate with devices such as digital thermometers and weather instruments. A network of 1-Wire devices with an associated master device is called a MicroLan. nnDoes Digi, Sierra Wireless, Encore, Red Lion, CradlePoint or any of the major M2M modem providers support 1-Wire to attach sensors an so forth?

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The Sierra Wireless GX440 is available and certified on AT&T and Verizon Wireless networks in the US. Contact your USAT Sales Manager for pricing and availability.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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GPS reports/data can be sent to local host devices that are connected to the GX device via WiFi in much the same way that they can be sent to local host devices connected to any AirLink product via Ethernet.

There are two ways to configure this:

1. If there are one or two host devices connected over WiFi, then configure one or two of the GPS Servers in ACE manager to send GPS reports to the local IP addresses that would be associated with that device (or devices). By default, the first address handed out by the modem to a WiFi host is 192.168.17.100, and the next addresses would be .101, .102, and so forth.

2. If there are three or more host devices connected to the GX device via WiFi, you can configure a GPS server to send reports to the wildcard address of 192.168.17.255. The modem would then send the GPS reports to any device connected via WiFi.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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There are multiple sizes of SIM cards in the marketplace; however it is important to note that the Sierra Wireless GX400 and GX440 both use a standard size SIM.

Please contact your USAT Sales Manager to identify the SIM that will work best for you. Note all devices provisioned by USAT will be network authenticated prior to shipment thereby removing any chance that you order the incorrect SIM.

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Static IPs are available on the Verizon LTE network. Your USAT Sales Manager can provide more information about working with USAT to activate Sierra Wireless WWAN Routers and gateways on the Verizon network.

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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The GX440 supports the following frequencies:

  • Verizon: Band 13 – UL 777-787Mhz, DL 746-756Mhz
  • AT&T: Band 17 – UL 704-716Mhz, DL 734-746Mhz (also Band 1 and Band 4 used outside the US)

Note: The Sierra Wireless GX440 does NOT support public safety Band 14 (D block) – UL 788-798Mhz, DL 758-768Mhz

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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Verizon: Band 13 – UL 777-787Mhz, DL 746-756Mhz

AT&T (future product): Band 17 – UL 704-716Mhz, DL 734-746Mhz (also Band 1 and Band 4 used outside the US

GX440 supports Verizon OR AT&T LTE frequencies, different embedded modules are required for Verizon and AT&T, therefore, there will be two distinct GX440 SKUs

GX440 does NOT support public safety Band 14 (D block) – UL 788-798Mhz, DL 758-768Mhz

 

Learn More about the Sierra Wireless Gx440

 

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This functionality only applies to devices using MSCI to communicate with ALMS:

  • MP, RV, GX, LS and ES devices from ALEOS firmware version 4.4.0 and onwards
  • Raven, MP, PintPoint on firmware version 4.0.11 or later

For devices that communicate with ALMS using LWM2M, the password field is no longer required. The M3DA password will still be required for AAF applications.

Prerequisite: Initialize the value

This one-time action is necessary to initialize the current password value set on the device on the AirVantage side. To initialize the ACEmanager value for already registered systems, you will need to:

  1. Select a system and click on Edit in the action bar or directly in the Actions column.
  2. In the Applications section, click on the icon  to edit the credentials for the ALEOS firmware.
  3. Set the ACEmanager password (in MSCI section). You can also set the M3DA password in the specific section. Default values when device comes out of factory are 12345.

Note: Initializing the values is only required for gateways commuicating using MSCI, and is not required if your gateway is configured with LWM2M.

As an alternative, you can also set the password at Registration, in the Advanced section as described below:

Change the ACEmanager password for one device

  1. Select your system and dive into the system configuration.
  2. Click on edit. Select the ‘ACEmanager password’ setting.
  3. Enter the new value and click on Apply
  4. At next device heartbeat, the password will be configured on the device.

Change the ACEmanager password for a fleet of devices

Go into Monitor system list and select all the devices you want to update the password on by filtering to the correct devices and using the “select all” checkbox. In the action bar, select the ‘Apply setting (CSV)’ item from the menu.

  1. In the dialog box that opens the first step will be to define a unique identifier to be used to provide the list of systems for which you want to change names. Let’s choose the Serial Number.
  2. Choose the version of firmware (application) that is used on the devices. All selected devices should be running the same version of ALEOS.
  3. The second field under ‘Setting’ is the value you want to change on each device. In this case, we want to change the ACEmanager password, so search for and select the ‘ACEmanager password’ setting.
  4. You will have to provide a .csv file with the values you want to apply to each device. Select ‘Generate’, and the system will generate this .csv file with the existing information for each device. Refer to the screenshot below for an example. In a tool that can edit .csv files, update the password field for each device as required. Save the updated file.
  5. Click the ‘Select a CSV…’ button and upload the updated .csv file to the system.
  6. Click on ‘Apply setting (CSV)’. For each device, at the next heartbeat, the ACEmanager password will be updated on the device.

ACEmanager password is considered sensitive information and therefore we highly recommend to configure each of your devices with a unique password.

While these instructions have been tailored for updating the ACEmanager password, any ALEOS setting can be updated in this way.

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Sierra Wireless Airlink LTE Cellular Gateways such as the RV50 and RV50X utilize 2×2 MIMO technology. MIMO equals Multi-In/Multi-out and is designed to improve the cellular signal and quality on both the down-link and up-link. MIMO for LTE works differently than the older optional 2G/3G Rx Diversity antenna in that it utilizes 2 distinct Tx and Rx signals which are intelligently combined to increase throughput where signal multipath is available. MIMO will increase throughput in areas where interference would otherwise cause throughput degradation. Two antennas must be used to achieve this performance as well as to comply with several updated network operator’s transmission requirements. (Verizon’s TM4 for example requires 2 antennas for reliable operation not just performance.) Unfortunately, there is no option to turn MIMO off in the newer LTE cellular gateways as there was on the 2G/3G devices since MIMO is a requirement of LTE.

This applies to Sierra Wireless Airlink Gateways: RV55, RV50, RV50X, MP70, MG90 and any other gateways that utilize 2×2 MIMO technology.

Please contact your USAT Sales Manager for help identifying your best antenna options and to learn more about our custom cable assemblies and jumpers.

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